Indian Symbol

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Indian Symbol - Hinduism is the main religion of India and its followers worship many hundreds of individual symbols - Indian Symbol

A useful guide to Indian Symbol. Discover facts and information on the Indian Rupee Currency Symbol, the Indian Symbol of Love and the Indian Flag.

Indian Symbol - Definition
There are hundreds of different symbols which are important in India from flowers, rivers, buildings and even sounds. Each symbol is an important part of the Indian culture. Birds are also symbolic in Indian culture, the owl for example symbolises death whereas the peacock symbolises love, it is sacred to Sarasvati who is the goddess of wisdom.

 

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Indian Flower Symbol
The lotus flower is extremely symbolic to followers of the Hindu faith. The creator god, Brahma is believed to have been born from a golden lotus flower which grew from the navel of Vishnu and a lotus flower with one thousand petals is said to be the symbol of spiritual enlightenment.

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American Indian Symbol
American Indians used war paint for rituals, celebrations and battles in an attempt to make the warriors and chiefs appear more frightening. The paint was also believed to hold magical powers. Animal symbols were also very important to Native Americans. Native American Indian animal symbols and totems were believed to represent the physical form of a spirit helper and guide.

Indian Rupee Symbol

The Indian currency is the Rupee and a single Rupee consists of on hundred paisas. Meaning silver coin, the rupee was first introduced by Sher Shah Suri in the 16th century who was founder of the Sur Empire (Northern India). The rupee is also the currency used in Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Mauritius, Seychelles and the Maldives but uses the symbol Rs.

Indian Flag | National Symbol

Indian Flag

Indian Rupee Symbol

National Symbols of India
The architecture of Hindu temples is extremely symbolic. Temples consist of a central tower which symbolises the top of a mountain. Mountains are sacred to the Hindus as they are believed to be the homes of the gods. Temples also have large wheels around their base. The wheels symbolise that the temple is the chariot of the sun god.

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Indian Symbol - Facts

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 1: Hinduism is the main religion practiced in India and important Hindu gods include Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 2: The cow is sacred to Hindus. It is valued for its milk and manure which is used to produce fuel. The cow is symbolic of mother earth

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 3: Many household in India have a shrine where daily worship (puja) takes place. Symbols included in the shrine are flowers, fruit and food

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 4: The Ganges river is the holiest river in India. It begins in the Himalayas which is believed to be the home of the gods and pilgrims come from all over the world to visit holy sites along the river

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 5: The symbol (Rs) is used to represent the rupee in Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Mauritius, Seychelles and the Maldives however the Indian rupee uses the symbol shown above

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 6: Hindu's prefer the term 'sanatana dharma' to describe their religion and not Hinduism which is more commonly used to describe followers of the Hindu faith

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 7: The lotus flower is symbolic to many Indians, a lotus flower with a thousand petals is a symbol of spiritual enlightenment

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 8: Many Hindus make a pilgrimage to Mount Kailas which they believe represents the mystical Mount Meru, the centre of the spiritual and physical world

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 9: The Hindu god Brahman is the supreme being and symbolises eternal life

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 10: The preserver god Vishnu has four specific symbols, these are the conch shell (shanka), the discus (chakra), lotus (padma) and a club (gaddha)

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 11: Diwali, the festival of lights is the most popular Hindu festival, it is held in honor of the goddess Lakshmi and symbolises the power of good over evil

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Indian Symbol Fact 12: The monkey Hanuman is Ramayana's general and symbolises courage, devotion and loyalty

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 13: The 'OM' symbol represents the god Brahman and the sound made by the syllable symbolises creation. It contains the sounds A, M and U which represents the gods Shiva, Brahma and Vishnu

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 14: To die on the banks of the Indian river Ganges and have your ashes float down the river is thought by Hindus to be the best death possible

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Fact 15: The Hindu god Brahma has four heads, each one represents a direction, North, South, East and West.

Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol

  • Meaning of American Indian Symbol

  • Origin and History of Indian National Symbol

  • Indian Rupee, Flower & Love Symbols

  • Pictures of Indian Symbol

Indian Symbol Image

 

Pictures and Videos of Indian Symbol
Discover the vast selection of pictures which relate to Indian Symbol and illustrate the different symbols, codes, emblems and signs that we see in everyday life. All of the articles and pages can be accessed via the Signology Index - a great educational resource for everyone! Find out about different Indian Symbol, their meaning and use today.

 

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